About Us

The Canadian Retina Society is composed of members of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society whose primary area of patient care consists of surgical and/or medical vitreoretinal (VR) disease.

Our Mission Statement

The mission of the Canadian Retina Society is to maintain the highest quality of patient care and teaching, particularly as it relates to the investigation and treatment of vitreoretinal (VR) disease; promote the interchange of information and scientific material and facilitate meetings of those who have a special interest in the diagnosis and management of VR pathology; work with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society on matters relating to health advocacy, health policy, and clinical guidelines on a national level.

Canadian Retina Society Board Members

Amin Kherani, MD

Amin Kherani, MD

Alberta

President

Cynthia Qian, MD

Cynthia Qian, MD

Québec

Vice-President

James Whelan, MD

James Whelan, MD

Newfoundland

Past-President

Arif Samad, MD

Arif Samad, MD

Nova Scotia

Secretary-Treasurer

Alan Berger, MD

Alan Berger, MD

Ontario

Member-at-Large

Varun Chaudhary, MD

Varun Chaudhary, MD

Ontario

Director, Continuing Professional Development

Jason Noble, MD

Ontario

Co-chair Scientific Meeting

2020 Canadian Retina Society Annual Meeting

Save the date!


When: February 13-16th, 2020

Where: Fairmont Banff Springs, Banff, Alberta

Education

Professional Development

Canadian Ophthalmic Imaging Symposium

Friday, May 10, and Saturday, May 11, 2019

Hotel X, Toronto, Ontario

For more information and to register, visit www.cois-scio.ca


Snapshot of the Month

A 12-year old Caucasian female was referred with decreased vision OS. Her past ocular history was remarkable for retinitis pigmentosa, a diagnosis shared by her father. Review of systems and social history were non-contributory. She was not taking any medications. Examination revealed a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/60 OD, and 20/150 OS. Anterior segment examination was revealed posterior subcapsular cataract and trace vitreous cell OU. Fundus examination demonstrated small punctate, whitish lesions scattered throughout the fundus OU consistent with their diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa. A yellowish retinal mass with a moderately dilated feeding artery and vein was noted in the temporal periphery OS (figure 1a). This lesion was surrounded by exudates. There were exudates surrounding the optic nerve. The presence of a vascular lesion was confirmed via fluorescein angiography (figure 1b, white arrows). Given these findings the patient was diagnosed with vasoproliferative tumor. The lesion was treated with laser photocoagulation.

figure 1

Title:

When it rains... it pours: A case of retinitis pigmentosa and vasoproliferative tumor

Credits:

Mark E. Seamone MSc, MD, FRCSC and Mark Greve MD FRCSC Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Location:

University of Alberta

Description:

A 12-year old Caucasian female was referred with decreased vision OS. Her past ocular history was remarkable for retinitis pigmentosa, a diagnosis shared by her father. Review of systems and social history were non-contributory. She was not taking any medications. Examination revealed a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/60 OD, and 20/150 OS. Anterior segment examination was revealed posterior subcapsular cataract and trace vitreous cell OU. Fundus examination demonstrated small punctate, whitish lesions scattered throughout the fundus OU consistent with their diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa. A yellowish retinal mass with a moderately dilated feeding artery and vein was noted in the temporal periphery OS (figure 1a). This lesion was surrounded by exudates. There were exudates surrounding the optic nerve. The presence of a vascular lesion was confirmed via fluorescein angiography (figure 1b, white arrows). Given these findings the patient was diagnosed with vasoproliferative tumor. The lesion was treated with laser photocoagulation.

Vasoproliferative tumor was first described by Shields et al., 1983 1. Primary lesions occur in 80 percent of cases with secondary lesions comprising the remaining 20 percent. Recently, Shields demonstrated the association of retinitis pigmentosa and secondary vasoproliferative tumor. Compared with primary lesions, secondary lesions are more often bilateral, affect younger patients, multifocal and associated with worse visual acuity 2. Accordingly, the diagnosis of vasoproliferative tumor in a young patient should prompt investigations for an associated ocular condition.


1 Shields, J. A., Decker, W. L., Sanborn, G. E., Augsburger, J. J. & Goldberg, R. E. Presumed Acquired Retinal Hemangiomas. Ophthalmology (1983). doi:10.1016/S0161-6420(83)34389-X

2 Shields, C. L. et al. Retinal vasoproliferative tumors: Comparative clinical features of primary vs secondary tumors in 334 cases. JAMA Ophthalmol. (2013). doi:10.1001/2013.jamaophthalmol.524

The Canada Retina Society publishes an interesting and educational Vitreo-Retinal related image every three months. We welcome submissions for consideration; please contact us at:


Snapshot of the Month Editors:

  • Ananda Kalevar, MD, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec
  • Michael Dollin, MD, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario
  • R. Rishi Gupta, MD, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Please note that the CRS reserves the right to edit Snapshot of the Month submissions

Interactive CPD Retina Case Studies

Patients

The link below provides patient information regarding the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of common retinal diseases.

Adverse Event Reporting

Click the following link to submit an adverse event report to CRS.